Commissions Galore!

I’ve been hard at work on my Commissions List, thanks to all of my wonderful viewers making custom orders over the holidays! Here are two new ones:

Zombie Pin-up Girl Crochet Hook Case

This lovely little bag is about 8″ long, 3″ deep with a zippered closure. It easily fits small snips/scissors, crochet hooks, and stitch markers, making it a nice little bag to chuck into a purse or tote for easy transport. The customer chose an Alexander Henry zombie pin-up girl print:

zombie

 

Legend of Zelda ID Card Wallet

The ID Card Wallet is a pattern by Dog Under My Desk. It features 5 card slots, a deeper pocket for cash, a small zippered change pocket, and a clear vinyl window for identification. We used a Zelda-inspired fabric available from Joanns.

zelda

Project Prepping

One of the worst things is when I start streaming and we spend a crazy amount of time cutting and fusing interfacings. Depending on the size of the project, this can be anywhere from an hour to two hours of preparation before we can even start sewing! That’s quite annoying and not terribly interesting for my viewers. There’s something I like to do though, and that’s to prepare projects ahead of time, then set them aside in storage. When I’m ready to do a project, I reach into storage, pull out the project, and we’re ready to go. Storage is as simple as a 1 gallon plastic ziplock bag!

First, cut out all of the pattern pieces:

Stack them all up and off to the side. You can use chalk to mark the pieces so you know what they go to for each pattern. I wouldn’t suggest packing it with the pattern pieces themselves if you’re going to cut out several projects at once.

Finally, I gently fold it up and stick it into a giant ziplock bag. Now, what I do NOT do is fuse the interfacings. You don’t want to do this, then put it in storage, because it could wrinkle and crease where you have to fold up the longer pieces. Instead, I will take the project out and fuse just before the stream. It doesn’t take long, depending on the project.

This is an excellent way to get a lot of little projects setup and ready for the Twitch stream!

Better Late Than Never?

Ok, so it’s been a while since I’ve blogged. I get that’s not ideal, but hear me out! My Twitch channel kind of took off and got crazy in the past few months. I have an average of 30 viewers most nights, so I’ve been putting a lot of time and energy into that effort and less into blogging. That said, I need to do the blog thing more often as I feel it would be a great extension to the stream, including tutorials!

So with that, let’s show off some eyecandy for some of the things I’ve made over the past couple of months:

ID Card Wallet

ID Card Wallet

Darth Crossbody Bag

Darth Crossbody Bag

Squirtle Wristlet

Squirtle Wristlet

Galaxy Wallet

Galaxy Wallet

Galaxy Wallet

Galaxy Wallet

Tardis Purse

Tardis Purse

Sailor Moon Wristlet

Sailor Moon Wristlet

Doctor Who Coat – Vogue 8346

Doctor Who Coat

The coat I have is roughly 18 years old. I’ve had it since I graduated high school, which means it has lived a long and good life protecting me from the brutal Winters of Northern Virginia and the somewhat-not-so-cold Winters in Texas. It was time for a new coat. I saw these awesome coats by Hot Topic in November. I wanted them, but when I saw them in the store, they felt flimsy and not well-constructed. I decided to make my own with a Victorian flare to it.

Doctor Who Coat

The perfect pattern for this project was Vogue 8346. It’s a fitted coat with a bit of a flare thanks to its circle hem design. Sizing was weird for me. I ended up making a muslin of the pattern per my measurements (36-27-38) which ended up being a Vogue 14. It was surprisingly accurate. Normally with the big-4 commercial patterns I drop down a size due to the copious amount of ease. This time, not so much. That’s ok though, I wanted a good fit, not an ego boost 😉

I streamed the whole construction of the coat from pattern tracing to finishing touches on Twitch (past recordings available here: http://www.twitch.tv/fiercekittenz). The instructions were VERY clear. I was able to put it together without doing much with the instructions. The only regret that I have was not serging the interior seams. I let them go since I thought the lining was stitched to the outer fabric. Not so. This pattern actually wants the lining to hang loose from the coat’s exterior. I had to tack the lining to the interior at the seams to ensure they weren’t exposed.

For the collar, I designed the embroidery patterns in Viking’s 6D software package. The right collar says “The Doctor” and the left says “Tardis.” The velveteen is still somewhat plush, so I made sure to use a water soluble stabilizer on the top to make the embroidery pop.

Additional photos:

Adding Sleeves – AKA: I hate making sleeve patterns

Long Sleeved Shirt

I hate making sleeve patterns.

I spent a good portion of my Thanksgiving break fussing over the sleeve pattern for this shirt, which was based on an earlier, warm weather sleeveless pattern I had made earlier in the year. I tried for a flat cap, but ended up going gathered since it’s the style, and to be honest, screw it. I was spending more time fussing over the sleeves than actually making anything that could be worn. The sleeve cap is ever so slightly gathered, which I do by putting two rows of basting stitches into the cap and gathering them up evenly to fit into the top-most portion of the armhole. The cuffs are hemmed with a 4mm rolled hem foot, but I put elastic channels into the sleeves so that they could be a little puffy and gathered looking at the ends.

The front has a box pleat of roughly 3″ pulled in total in the neckline. That can easily be eliminated, but I think it brings some dynamic to the design. The back is the same, simple keyhole button closure.

The fabric I got on a whim. It was 50% off at Hancock’s Fabrics, so I picked up the amount I needed (roughly 1.5 yards) for under $5. Not bad, if you ask me! My daughter loves it… loves it so much she won’t wear it yet. Figures. I have another stash of fabric to make this out of, and this was the wearable muslin just to make darn sure I didn’t mess any of the measurements up.

I used Twitch.tv to stream the entire construction of the shirt. The recording you can find here, if you’re interested: http://www.twitch.tv/fiercekittenz/v/30182718 I have found that I’m getting a little more used to interacting with viewers while sewing, but it is best for me to work on things that I’m really good at while getting acquainted with streaming first. I’m going with some easier, better known patterns going forward. I’ll be making a Colette Sorbetto out of some lovely fabric from The Cloth Pocket, which looks very much like Gallifreyan in the next week or two!